The 90's Billboard #1's Rate (1995-1999): #44 - When people wore pyjamas and lived life slow | Page 48 | The Popjustice Forum
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The 90's Billboard #1's Rate (1995-1999): #44 - When people wore pyjamas and lived life slow

Discussion in 'Charts, rates etc' started by Ironheade, Mar 3, 2018.

  1. Okay, if we're doing hip hop eliminations that can certainly be the first.

    I've never really hated Puff Daddy that much, but I agree with the fact that he always sounds so bored on his songs and whenever you throw Mase in there, who is somehow even more monotone, it can be time for a nap pretty quickly.

    His celebrity persona kinda of reminds me Nick Cannon for some reason, but Nick gave me the girl group School Gyrls so he's already more iconic in my eyes.
     
  2. 20 years later and not a lot has changed, huh?
     
  3. East Coast rap, eh guys? Aye, exactly.
     
    WowWowWowWow likes this.
  4. Oh hey, are there significant musical differences between east coast rap and west coast rap? This is the kind of thing that would've gone way over my 10-year-old head at the time.
     
  5. It would still go over my head, mostly because I don't care in the slightest!

    (And the fact that I've never lived on either of those coasts.)
     
    WowWowWowWow and londonrain like this.
  6. I was just letting everyone know where I stand.
     
  7. [​IMG]

    Yes that's correct, I couldn't have been so well spoken.

    But I have to tell you I don't really like Bryan Adams, just three or four songs:

    There is "Summer of 69" 'cause that's a song I love and it's his best song. "Everything I do I do It For You" 'cause let's face it: I'm a woman and women tend to fall for such songs. "Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman" because of this hilarious movie. And maybe "All For Love" but mostly because of Sting. I adore Sting, he could sing the telephone book (if anybody remembers that such books existed) and I would like it.

    The guitars are not the reason I like the songs. Those rock songs always came along with guitars in the 80ies and 90ies ... listening to those guitar solos today sometimes makes me wonder why I exactly liked this special song ...


    And @all
    About all the other songs that are gone:
    You gave me back the faith I had in your musical taste!

    [​IMG]
     
  8. My fave Bryan Adams song is 'Back To You'. It's so cute. Drag me.
     
    WowWowWowWow and Filippa like this.
  9. Not @Filippa listing all the Bryan Adams songs that got played the absolute most when I was growing up. Perhaps I’d feel differently about them if I hadn’t heard them ALL. THE. TIME.

    Cloud Number Nine and Don’t Give Up are low-key bops, though - and of course When You’re Gone is his best song.
     
    K94, Ray, dancingwithmyself and 4 others like this.
  10. The regionalism starts to break down towards the end of the decade, and the dominance of the coasts fades a bit by the time we get to the 2000's. But yes, particularly in the early and mid 90's, they do tend towards distinct styles. Within each of these styles, you can find a lot of variation, in terms of subject matter, flows, production, etc., but when people talk about an "East Coast" or "West Coast" style of gangsta rap, these are the general tendencies they'll mean.

    East Coast: Usually has more of that grimy street-oriented sound, and tends to gravitate towards more aggressive boom-bap beats with heavy bass and Public Enemy-style sample collages. Frequently, they'll use a lot of jazz and 70's soul samples. Usually there's more focus on the lyrics, with the rappers using lots of intricate wordplay and metaphors and more complex flows than the West Coast, and it's also more likely than the West Coast to touch on political or social issues.

    West Coast: At this time, popular West Coast rap usually means G-funk, as popularized by Dr. Dre with The Chronic; slower and more laid-back beats than the East, lots of sampling from old funk and R&B records, and the distinctive lead synth sounds that you hear all over that album. The lyrics are usually more aggressive and focused around the gang lifestyle than the East, but with a more chilled delivery for the most part, and without quite as much focus on lyricism, more on flow and vibes.

    Yeah, I'm not really an expert, and like I say, you get a lot of variation. But as far as the rivalry goes, that's pretty much the two styles we're dealing with.
     
  11. Even speaking as someone firmly not on board the Misandryjustice train (and really it's unnecessary in a rate that's clearly heading for an all-female top 10) I struggle to think of good things to say about Bryan Adams.

    Summer Of '69 was fun in my student days and Run To You is...OK, I suppose. That's about it.
     
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  12. Educate us a bit dad!!!
     
    K94, ohnoitisnathan, Jeffo and 7 others like this.
  13. Yeah guilty for being very cliché like.

    I know the songs you've mentioned. No I don't like them. But I do admit Run To You is a good song but too much Bryan not enough Mel C. And this one was played to death here ... we love Mel C.

    Correction: Certainly talking about When Your Gone. Sorry for the mistake.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
    Empty Shoebox likes this.
  14. Well, you sound like an expert! You really are the perfect host for this, aren't you?
     
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  15. 2014

    2014 Moderator

    A BOP!
     
  16. I love when @Ironheade speaks rap. Especially when he goes off on terrible rap tracks. Reminds me of the good ol 00s Rate.

    Basically this is me asking you to run a rap rate.
     
    K94, Ray, Blond and 10 others like this.
  17. I’m not even mad at them for just doing the same exact thing for multiple other songs that were perfectly fine in their original incarnation.









    Like, you know exactly what it’s going to sound like, you know the rapper is going to dedicate it to somebody, you know there’s probably a modulation for the last verse. Consistent king and queen!
     
  18. Come out of the woodwork, Cypress Hill stans!
     
  19. Run To You doesn’t have any Mel C on it, though. When You’re Gone is the Mel C duet. (I say “duet”, but all she does is sing harmony vocals a third above Bryan for the whole song.)
     
    A$AP Robbie, WowWowWowWow and Filippa like this.
  20. I would be so here for this
     
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