Who had the biggest decline in a career? (Musically/Commercially) | Page 13 | The Popjustice Forum
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Who had the biggest decline in a career? (Musically/Commercially)

Discussion in 'Comeback corner' started by Tommy Johnson, Oct 7, 2017.

  1. Louis Walsh strikes again?
     
    Island likes this.
  2. Has Norah Jones been mentioned yet?

    From the debut album selling over 10 million copies to her latest release selling 156.000 copies (in the US).
     
    Eric Generic likes this.
  3. In mitigation, that's been over the course of 15 years or so. But yes she's been on a downward spiral commercially ever since the debut. Given its impact, who wouldn't be...
     
    LP and berserkboi like this.
  4. Poor Liberty X must be considered (sorry if they have been). Justice for Kelli.
     
  5. Yeah that's interesting...perhaps early 1990s MCA = Missing Chart Action?
     
  6. Nik Kershaw was on MCA for his peak and decline. As was Tiffany, now I come to think of it.
     
    mung_bean and Eric Generic like this.
  7. Jody Watley too & Bobby Brown.
     
    mung_bean and Eric Generic like this.
  8. First time I saw that name, I assumed they were one of those dodgy opportunistic pre-release cover groups you used to sometimes get in the chart before on-air-on-sale became standard practice, like when "Precision Tunes" made the top 10 with 'Payphone' before Maroon 5 did.

    Then I heard their songs, and... still thought that.
     
    mung_bean, Eric Generic and bichard like this.
  9. I don't think I've seen East 17 mentioned yet... Their fall from grace was swift and not surprisingly got messier with every year that passed by... As far I'm aware now it's the two backing dancers and a session singer gigging under the East 17 name (to less than 20 people per show it seems)
     
    ohnoitisnathan likes this.
  10. There was some shenanigans with MCA buying Geffen from Warners sometime in 1990...I remember all those albums switching catalogue numbers and manufacturing from the Warner stable to ugly MCA disc and sleeve designs. So perhaps that took their attention away from maintaining careers for their existing roster of artists. They gained big-sellers like Cher in her imperial AOR phase, and acts like Don Henley and Joni Mitchell.
     
    mung_bean likes this.
  11. Yes, this was closer to 1995 though. [Boring music industry stuff follows]

    A lot of money got pumped into MCA, who had an imprint called Universal at the time. Said corporate behemoth then spent that money on acquiring firstly Geffen/Interscope (huge in both rock and hip hop at the time) then Island, Polydor, Decca, Mercury, Go Discs, etc to create what is now Universal Music for better or worse.
     
    lob0to and Eric Generic like this.
  12. Was Belinda Carlisle released through MCA in the US?
     
  13. IRS was distributed by MCA at the time if I'm not mistaken, for her first album, and for Heaven MCA was her actual label.
     
  14. cough cough, Rachel Stevens anyone?
     
  15. Had to post this piece from Record Mirror in October 1984. It definitely features a band who’ve been mentioned in this thread.

    Was this the only good review Waking Up With The House On Fire ever got?!

    [​IMG]
     
    Txetxu likes this.
  16. I wouldn't include her here. She basically disappeared after the best album on the year. That's not really a decline.
     
    AfternoonsInUtopia likes this.
  17. Ha, Dylan Jones. I expect he was paid to write a positive review of that, and/or was taking so many drugs himself that the album sounded different to the rest of us.
     
  18. It’s interesting considering it’s a good review that he picks at it too. No obvious chart contenders...VERY laid back...Bemoaning the lack of Helen Terry...

    The reviews in Smash Hits and No.1 were more down to earth.
     
    Eric Generic likes this.
  19. And aside from the S Club reunion, what has she been up to?
     
  20. I'm still not happy about her thread being called like that, because every time someone replies to it, for a split second, I think she is actually back with new music.
     
    Eric Generic likes this.