ABBA

Take A Chance On Me and Money Money Money are done and ready to go. Possibly Super Trouper too. It’s only a matter of time. Take A Chance On Me was in the final band rehearsal setlist but by the time they got into the arena to rehearse with the screens, it was dropped.

Svana was saying it’s not so easy to just switch a song out, because of the way the whole show is programmed, they’d have to build it all again from scratch. So it may not change until a new venue pops up.
Interesting. Although the way these technologies develop i’m wondering if something that seemed hard 2-3 years ago might not be nearly so difficult now…
 
That introduction to them sounds familiar, my olds had the albums and they were played throughout my childhood. My Dad would always tape them for mobile use (he would buy vinyl 95% of the time and didn’t rate cassettes as a permanent source to store music, no wonder he jumped in CDs when the arrived) and so a lot of my formative music listening was on car journeys.

One vivid memory was hearing Money Money Money as my parents scrabbled for change to pay the Severn Bridge toll as we went to visit relatives. Another was hearing the Visitors album played repeatedly on a holiday in Cornwall as the album had just been purchased so naturally it was the new one to hear.

Oddly I then ‘forgot’ about them until their renaissance in ‘92 with the Dancing Queen cd single issue - this prompted me to fish out my taped versions and then Abba sort of seeped back into my listening habits. I’ve never been snobbish about music tastes so i don’t have an obvious answer why they faded into the background but I’m glad I came back to the fold!

I think they faded into obscurity in general in the 80’s, even for fans. That’s partly their own doing too! They barely promoted The Visitors or The First 10 Years and I think all 4 of them had emotionally moved on from ABBA - so that was kind of reflected in what happened in music in general.

What I do love is just how full circle they’ve come since then and nobody seems more amazed or surprised by their success than the ABBA members themselves. They honestly believed they were dead and buried in the 80’s.

Over 50 years since their first recordings together, here we all are still talking about them and, more importantly, still listening to the songs.

Take away the costumes and their squeaky clean 70’s image, the bottom line is that those songs are perfection on record and that’s why they’ve survived.
 
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Just booked this as well, only Dance Floor tickets left. Can't wait! 3rd visit and the fact that they'll actually be there is going to be insane.
 
Watching all the BBC4 docs last night and my own memories, ABBA were dead and buried by the mid to late 80s. It seems bizarre now thinking Woolworth's were selling the cheap price Pickwick label compilations then.

It’s bizarre, we know that they were pretty much considered a spent force, but those 80’s compilations sold like hot cakes. Back then, there was no budget albums chart (didn’t start until 1997), so the rule was that cheap compilations and budget releases had to sell double that of a standard release to get the same sales accreditations.

Pickwick’s “The Hits 2” sold over 200,000 copies by 1990 and was given a gold BPI sales award. Telstar’s “Absolute ABBA” actually sold so well it broke into the main album chart over Christmas 1988. The Hits, The Hits 3 and The Love Songs all sold over 150,000 copies.

Thanks to the plethora of budget CD’s available, ABBA actually sold over a million records in the UK between 1987 and 1991. They just mostly weren’t eligible to chart.

So despite their very uncool image at the time, somebody was still buying their records. I think it was @Hudvar tbh…
 
Sounds about right - I had (and still have) all of those on cassette, and they were in every supermarket and service station.

The Collection was my fave though - 24 tracks, really good choices: six UK number ones, six top tens, six lesser hits, and six album tracks.
 
There is no “Before ABBA” for me. My mother loved them and listened to them while she was pregnant with me.

I remember long car journeys as a kid between the UK & Ireland listening to all the CDs. The first song I really remember being entranced by was Super Trouper! I also apparently used to sing “feel the beat of the tangerine”

Then as I got older, I eclipsed my mother in terms of fan level. I spend an obscene amount of money travelling to various events and collecting merch.

They are my everything. I wouldn’t want to go on living in a world without ABBAs music
 
I watched the '74 Contest in full (scrobbled a little through the voting); some cute songs, I See a Star was a bop, but Waterloo was so far ahead of the pack it's unreal.

Just imagining a world where they didn't win, or sent Hasta Manana instead, and became nothing more than a Euro curiosity with a handful of continental quirky hits only to be remembered at the same level as someone like Boney M or Brotherhood of Man. SCREAM.
 
I watched the '74 Contest in full (scrobbled a little through the voting); some cute songs, I See a Star was a bop, but Waterloo was so far ahead of the pack it's unreal.

Just imagining a world where they didn't win, or sent Hasta Manana instead, and became nothing more than a Euro curiosity with a handful of continental quirky hits only to be remembered at the same level as someone like Boney M or Brotherhood of Man. SCREAM.
OK but why’d you have to do Boney M dirty like this?
 
It’s bizarre, we know that they were pretty much considered a spent force, but those 80’s compilations sold like hot cakes. Back then, there was no budget albums chart (didn’t start until 1997), so the rule was that cheap compilations and budget releases had to sell double that of a standard release to get the same sales accreditations.

Pickwick’s “The Hits 2” sold over 200,000 copies by 1990 and was given a gold BPI sales award. Telstar’s “Absolute ABBA” actually sold so well it broke into the main album chart over Christmas 1988. The Hits, The Hits 3 and The Love Songs all sold over 150,000 copies.

Thanks to the plethora of budget CD’s available, ABBA actually sold over a million records in the UK between 1987 and 1991. They just mostly weren’t eligible to chart.

So despite their very uncool image at the time, somebody was still buying their records. I think it was @Hudvar tbh…
Absolute ABBA did have a tv advert campaign though.
 
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