Björk - Fossora

She spoke about them on the podcast. She said they were recorded then, but just didn't fit the energy of Debut so revisited them for Post. (But she said it with more eloquence and a much better accent than me!)
So many incredible songs written for that first album!

I think I came across a recording of her performing an early version of Army of Me live in 1993 on YouTube before Post came out. Can’t seem to find it.

Edit: I think I found it. The horns sound like the ones Art of Noise used.

 
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Reviews can be published from the 20th on. Streams are already being sent out to journalists. I received one and I can only say it exceeded any expectation I had.
No spoilers obviously but let me ask a question!

Premise 1: it has been taught that Björk's work is regulated by internal cyclical forces and kinship lines between albums.
Premise 2: it may be speculated that Fossora forms a three-ring chain with Vulnicura and Utopia, a sort of ground-zero\re-building\re-rooting kind of trilogy.
Question: if Vulnicura followed the stark strings+beats Homogenic blueprint and Utopia repurposed the fantasy, softness and intricate sonic weaving of Vespertine, is Fossora the Medúlla? Earthy, inky, harsh, jarring, very uncompromising, sort of folk, concerned with ancestors, motherhood and community? Because that's an impression I haven't been able to shake off since we've seen that first picture last year. Even the font is giving Medúlla. The Bill Kaulitz eyeshadow!

Blink once for yes, twice for no.
 
No spoilers obviously but let me ask a question!

Premise 1: it has been taught that Björk's work is regulated by internal cyclical forces and kinship lines between albums.
Premise 2: it may be speculated that Fossora forms a three-ring chain with Vulnicura and Utopia, a sort of ground-zero\re-building\re-rooting kind of trilogy.
Question: if Vulnicura followed the stark strings+beats Homogenic blueprint and Utopia repurposed the fantasy, softness and intricate sonic weaving of Vespertine, is Fossora the Medúlla? Earthy, inky, harsh, jarring, very uncompromising, sort of folk, concerned with ancestors, motherhood and community? Because that's an impression I haven't been able to shake off since we've seen that first picture last year. Even the font is giving Medúlla. The Bill Kaulitz eyeshadow!
Blink once for yes, twice for no.
Blinking once.

It even has reminiscences musically. It knots together a lot. As Medúlla it also is the most challenging listen of that cycle. But extremely more exciting than Utopia ever was.


The quoted tweet here is also implying the finale of a trilogy.
 
Blinking once.

It even has reminiscences musically. It knots together a lot. As Medúlla it also is the most challenging listen of that cycle. But extremely more exciting than Utopia ever was.

The quoted tweet here is also implying the finale of a trilogy.
Slut-dropping to Ancestors, duck-walking to Miðvikudags, doing the hustle to Trölla-Gabba, boogie-woogieing to Fagurt Er Í Fjörðum etc.
 
Supposedly, this is the back cover of the album:
fossora-back.jpg


Not gonna lie, I'm loving the utilization of this fungibet.
 
I honestly can't imagine Bjork getting more dense/challenging than Vulnicura and Utopia, but I'm actually excited by the idea. Both of those albums are in my Bjork top 5, so I'm happy for her to make our heads spin.

@theincredibleflipper Can I ask what the most "out there"/head spinning song on the album is? (No biggie if not!)
 
I honestly can't imagine Bjork getting more dense/challenging than Vulnicura and Utopia, but I'm actually excited by the idea. Both of those albums are in my Bjork top 5, so I'm happy for her to make our heads spin.

@theincredibleflipper Can I ask what the most "out there"/head spinning song on the album is? (No biggie if not!)
Personally I never found Utopia and Vulnicura super challenging. Especially the latter had a lot of structure and melodies. Just not that simple. Here a lot of times more stuff is happening, often at the same time.
It is also a world of contrasts: the album’s two lodestones are bass clarinet and violent outbursts of gabber. There are moments of astonishing virtuosity and bewildering complexity and, like much of her recent music, a resistance to easy melody.
I'd say the title track is the most "out there".
 
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