Britney Spears - General Discussion | Page 4631 | The Popjustice Forum

Britney Spears - General Discussion

Discussion in 'Comeback corner' started by Toxicated, Jun 24, 2006.

  1. This is a much lesser gripe than Lutfi’s screentime in the article, but I also thought we as a fanbase moved past the need for Jordan Miller years ago dddd I know this will trigger my good sis @VicePresidentJocasta
     
    lilylu likes this.
  2. It's only necessary since Jordan was the one who kind of sparked it all in the beginning, and I remember him being one of the people to actually leak the voicemail of Britney calling her lawyer? He kind of called Team B's bluff on their threat to sue as well. I still think about the image of Britney he had in the site header of her in handcuffs with her face pixelated. The drama of it all.
     
  3. To be fair to Miss Jordan, he really was one of the first to say #FreeBritney but then Jamie threatened to sue the site. He has a very strange… vibe years down the road, though.

    He’s apparently friends with Lutfi, but Lutfi tweeted recently that Britney shared some unreleased tracks with Jordan to share with the fans… but has kept most to himself. I’m trying to find the tweet dddd
     
    neinzedd likes this.
  4. Anyway, we can view most of the Instagram theories with skepticism, but can we already acknowledge that this was a very clear reference to Janet’s Control? Britney being a Janet stan knew what she was doing here and I wouldn’t be surprised if this actually slipped through her uncultured “team”
     
  5. So is the "team member" in the article Vivian "daddy knows best" Thoreen?
     
  6. The member of Britney’s team that was quoted is most likely Larry. I’m sure Vivian was as well since the use of “daddy” is unmistakable.
     
  7. I read the latest NYT piece on Britney and god, the whole thing just continues to get even worse than we first imagined.

    Her dad saying “I’m Britney Spears!” made me feel sick. Fuck him, fuck her team, fuck her entire family.
     
  8. I loved this look. With some hair and makeup adjustments she looks ready to collect her Grammys for Glory.
     
    An Insider likes this.
  9. This was an interesting read, though I'm still thinking what to make of it. Posting some excerpts here:

    It’s Not Just Britney

    In the U.S., those deemed “mentally ill” can easily lose basic rights.

    Britney Spears’s Experience Shows How We Treat Mentally Ill (thecut.com)

    Here’s something that people who haven’t experienced a scenario like this don’t tend to know: There’s no real way to prove you do or don’t have some mental illness. These diagnoses remain unsubstantiated biologically, more metaphor than medicine. This was even admitted by the then-head of the National Institute of Mental Health back in 2013. (“Unlike our definitions of ischemic heart disease, lymphoma, or AIDS, the DSM diagnoses are based on a consensus about clusters of clinical symptoms, not any objective laboratory measure,” wrote Dr. Thomas Insel in a post on the NIMH’s website. “In the rest of medicine, this would be equivalent to creating diagnostic systems based on the nature of chest pain or the quality of fever.”) The medical mysteriousness of psychiatry’s diagnoses allows for a lot of confusion about these topics, both among experts and the public. This allows for a perpetuation of the status quo, which in practice tends to beget the abuse of power, however constituted — whether that’s the brainwashing of the American public for the profit of Big Pharma or the seizure of Britney’s assets and personhood by those nominally tasked with ensuring her care.

    For every Britney Spears, there are an untold number of exceedingly less-famous Britneys trapped in their own private hells, perhaps being controlled by the state or by a family member, all of them stories that are surely as harrowing as Britney’s, if not more so. These are stories that, until we actually recognize the full humanity of “mentally ill” people, we will continue to ignore. Our legal system and medical system are designed to ignore such people. And the public, as well, has long seemed extremely dismissive of the voices of the supposed “insane.” Maybe until last week.

    To psychiatric survivors, what’s happened to Britney is everyday, obvious, banal. She is one of them. The press and the public, on the other hand, were astonished last week when they heard the alleged particulars of Britney’s case: How she can’t own a smartphone. How she can’t ride in her boyfriend’s car, let alone marry him. How they won’t let her get an IUD removed so she can have a baby.

    In America, however, the coercive approach continues to be all we know and all we fund, really. We tend to overlook the promise of mental-health-care “alternatives” (as they tend to be termed). These include non-judgmental support groups for people who hear voices and for those who are considering suicide, as well as safe houses for those experiencing acute crises. Such approaches tend to be comparatively cost-effective and totally hope-inspiring — and, in my experience, few Americans have ever heard of them.

    The day after Britney’s statement to an L.A. court last week, one heard around the world, I called up a psychiatric-survivor activist I’ve gotten to know, Caroline Mazel-Carlton. Mazel-Carlton, who’s also a rabbi-in-training, works for an organization that is revolutionizing mental-health care in western Massachusetts (and beyond), called the Wildflower Alliance. I asked her what she thinks of so many people suddenly rallying around psychiatric patients’ civil rights — or the rights of one patient, at least.

    “To me, honestly, it’s just a relief,” Mazel-Carlton said. “Sometimes I even cry, to hear people finally saying, ‘That’s not right. That’s not right.’”

    “I just want to say to people: Welcome to this movement,” said Mazel-Carlton. “It’s one of the less well-known liberation movements, but we’re really excited to have you if you want to fight by our sides and not just Britney’s.”
     
  10. Toxic being pushed for a single choice.
    Blackout's entirety
    Mannequin making the tracklist for Circus.
    Glory's amazing reception after the distaste that was Britney Jean

    Britney has proven time and time again that she knows what's best for her fans and her career when it comes to her music and the fact that her team robbed her of so many incredible things she could've passionately crafted. UGH.

    I mean, a definite backseat anything career related because her rights stripped as human being definitely come first and foremost.
     
  11.  
    QueenB and upu like this.
  12. Society has LONG moved on from needing to hear from Joseph Kahn.
     
  13. why?
     
  14. He's generally kind of an asshole but I'll make an exception this one time.
     
  15. Looking back through everything and trying to understand the timeline of it all, yes, some fans do get a little self-aggrandizing with their involvement, but looking back, the original voicemail that blew the lid off everything really speaks volumes now compared to what was the official narrative versus what everyone knows now is the truth:



    And I get why some fans may feel a resentment or annoyance at those who championed the movement early on because it comes off as self-important, but whoever that man is that left that voicemail over two years ago truly may have played the key role in this coming to light.

    Whoever that person is, despite it being written off originally, essentially acted as a whistleblower regarding what may be the largest case of conservatorship abuse in modern American medical history. What's being done here illegally will have ramifications that reach down far beyond just the issues found in this case and just Britney.
     
  16. Jail. Every. Single. One. Of. Them.
     
    QueenB likes this.
  17. That phone call is perhaps one of the strangest thing to happen in pop culture. Did we even figure out who that was? Why would a paralegal risk his entire career to alert a random podcast? I’ve seen people theorize that it was actually just Cade, but I think it was Lynne-related, given it was supplemented by her liking random fans’ #FreeBritney posts at the time. To be fair, it actually forced them to have Britney to surface.

    This may open a can of worms, but I think a reason fans believed it so easily was that Britney really wasn’t the same since her breakdown, and it seemed like a way to explain it. Up to that point though, we had very little reason to believe her family was actively hurting her so it was also very reckless.
     
    Runawaywithme likes this.
  18. By the way, did a little digging and for anyone who actually wants to get involved in raising hell pressure for Ingham, fans have put together a step-by-step guide on how to send a complaint to the State Bar: https://linktr.ee/inghamenditnow

    It already has formats and attachments you can use, though I haven’t personally filed the complaint yet (I’ll do it tomorrow)! But I’m willing to try this time around as it doesn’t seem like it’ll take more than a few minutes, even though it does make me anxious as I haven’t done this before.

    [​IMG]

    The last time this was done was before Britney’s testimony and the general response fans got was “client confidentiality”, but now may be a different animal. It’s particularly uncomfortable with some new news right now that Ingham was accused of being involved in the death of Casey Kasem.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2021
  19. No, we still have no idea who it was. I think the girls from the podcast said they verified it. Although, NYT said the opposite when it was mentioned in Framing Britney. I had some suspicions that it was probably a fan that was told to leak the info by Lynne or Felicia.
     
    nooniebao, myblood, Hyrulian and 3 others like this.
  20. Yeah, it had to have been a stan or something who got wind of the information. The podcast wasn’t even huge at the time so it sounds like stan behavior. In all fairness to Lynne, I remember she was very much involved with the court hearings in 2019, demanding to be privy to the details more.

    The turning point for me personally leaning more towards being critical of the conservatorship was when Jayden himself said he’s been trying to get his Mom out of it, but every time he does, he gets shut down. God knows how all of this is affecting those boys.
     
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