Lana Del Rey - Did you know that there's a tunnel under Ocean Blvd

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Give us descriptions and first-listen thoughts!

I’d need to sit with it more, but on first listen I think there’s such a cool through-line between Norman, Chemtrails, Blue Bannisters, and this album to the point that it closes out with “Venice Bitch”, which gives off a vibe like it’s placing a bow on the whole saga. It’s very similar to how there was a clear line from Born to Die through Lust for Life, where we followed her going from New York to LA and her trying to find happiness and freedom. She’s escaping California burning down on the cover of NFR; maybe she’s lost at sea before finding herself in the Midwest and becoming unknown and we spend the majority of the next few albums unpacking her family history, personal traumas, and reflecting on her place in the world around her.
 
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I’d need to sit with it more, but on first listen I think there’s such a cool through-line between Norman, Chemtrails, Blue Bannisters, and this album to the point that it closes out with “Venice Bitch”, which gives off a vibe like it’s placing a bow on the whole saga. It’s very similar to how there was a clear line from Born to Die through Lust for Life, where we followed her going from New York to LA and her trying to find happiness and freedom. She’s escaping California burning down on the cover of NFR; maybe she’s lost at sea before finding herself in the Midwest and becoming unknown and we spend the majority of these album unpacking her family history, personal traumas, and the world around her.

This is an interesting take and I will have it in the back of my mind when I have my first listen. I haven’t grouped her albums together like that before.
 
I am definitely excited to receive a new Lana album tomorrow but still a little bitter that I once again got my hopes up on the alleged unreleased tracks release.
 
One of my high school students thinks that all Lana Del Ray's recent output (Norman Fucking Rockwell to the new singles) sucks because the lyrics are middle aged white lady problems whereas the old music had adolescent appeal. This student is one of the most brilliant 15 year olds I've ever come across but that is one of the worst pop music takes of all time.

Middle aged white lady problems is not a good descriptor at all of her later period work and her lyrics have gotten significantly better over time. As good as the music was, some of the lyrics on the early albums were a bit rough. Ultraviolence is dripping with eyerolling cliches that are just worded in an aesthetically pleasing way. It wasn't bringing anything particularly insightful to the table whereas I think her more recent output mostly does. That's not to say Ultraviolence's lyrics aren't good. They are definitely artful and deploy language and literary devices well. But the concepts can be a bit stupid and trite. Not gonna lie.

I do think you can make a strong argument that the actual music on Born To Die or Ultraviolence has more verve, color, and texture to it than the more recent albums. But the lyrics are significantly worse, as they should be. I mean, why in the world should an older Lana Del Ray's music have adolescent appeal? That's what actually bothers me about a lot of other pop girls' work. Some of them sing about romance in a way that should have been left in high school.
Yes to all of this but I'm sorry, NOT Lana Del RAY, Reichu, not in release week!
 
I just finished my first full listen through. It was a bit disjointed (meaning I was at work and it got interrupted here and there) and I wasn't really able to pay attention to lyrics, so it was mostly about getting a musical vibe for me.

I can safely and easily say it's brilliant. It manages to evolve her sound in a very natural way - it feels looser and more free. Early favorites are Sweet, Paris Texas, and Peppers.

I will say that both the Judah Smith and Jon Batiste Interludes are absolutely useless and are going to be promptly deleted from the album for me. If each were like ... 45 seconds long I would appreciate what they might add thematically and sonically, but they both drag on for way too long and I can't imagine anyone wanting to listen to either of them more than the first time ddd. Truly a "what the fuck was she thinking" moment on an otherwise pretty perfect record. In fact, while it's way too early to call, I can see this joining the upper echelons of her albums for me with Ultraviolence and NFR!
 
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New photo from Spotify Korea's Pop Rising playlist:

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