Late 1960s Hits Rate | #48 | A Hazey Family favorite gets the "didn't know this filler song, didn't care for it" treatment.

What is your favorite radio station?


  • Total voters
    17
he/him
#58

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Haan FM's British Invasion 15th/15

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The Rolling Stones - Jumpin' Jack Flash

7.538

Highest
| 10 x 3 | @DJHazey, @One of One, @unnameable

Lowest | 2 | @daninternational | 4.75 | @Maki

Released | May 1968

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#1
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#3

Halfway Mark
| #58 (7.725) -- it had risen to #54 before @daninternational voted.

Songfacts | Who is "Jack Flash"? His name is Jack Dyer, and he was Keith Richards' gardener. Richards explained to Rolling Stone in 2010: "The lyrics came from a gray dawn at Redlands. Mick and I had been up all night, it was raining outside, and there was the sound of these boots near the window, belonging to my gardener, Jack Dyer. It woke Mick up. He said, 'What's that?' I said, 'Oh, that's Jack. That's jumping Jack.' I started to work around the phrase on the guitar, which was in open tuning, singing the phrase 'Jumping Jack.' Mick said, 'Flash,' and suddenly we had this phrase with a great rhythm and ring to it."

That's...not exactly what I would've expected the origination to be.

Mick Jagger said this song is about "having a hard time and getting out. Just a metaphor for getting out of all the acid things." As Richards explained in Rolling Stone, he's very proud of his guitar part in this song. "When you get a riff like 'Flash,' you get a great feeling of elation, a wicked glee," he said. "I can hear the whole band take off behind me every time I play 'Flash' - there's this extra sort of turbo overdrive. You jump on the riff and it plays you. Levitation is probably the closest analogy to what I feel."

Yes the guitars are ace on this song, it's always been a 'dad-rock bop' in my eyes, had no idea it would the kind of apathy/hatred in this rate or I probably would not have chosen it. Hindsight is 20/20 etc.

A promotional film, which was an early music video, was shot with The Stones performing this wearing body paint and outrageous costumes. The paint and costumes would become a trend in the '70s with bands like Kiss.

"Jumpin' Jack Flash" marked a transition to guitar rock for the Rolling Stones. Early on, they were more of a blues band, which reflected the influence of founding member Brian Jones. The went psychedelic on their previous album, Her Satanic Majesties Request, but by 1968 Jones was less a factor in the band and the group shed his influence. In 1969, they fired Jones, who was found dead in his swimming pool less than a month later.

In the US, this was a hit for Aretha Franklin in 1986. Her version was produced by Keith Richards, who also played guitar. It hit #21. The title was used for the name of a Whoopi Goldberg movie in 1986. Aretha Franklin's version was used in the film.

This song was used as the finale in the rhythm-action game Elite Beat Agents for the Nintendo DS. It is the second half of a two-part scenario, the first half being "Without a Fight."

This is the most-performed song by the Rolling Stones. The band have played this during every tour since its release in 1968.

Commentary

@berserkboi (5.5) - Not great!

@daninternational (2) - Never heard before, and never want to again.

@Maki (4.75) - "Paint It, Black" sweetie I'm so sorry.

*shrugs* dd, I had no clue "Paint It Black" had such a strong following on Popjustice or I would've picked it easily. I love this and gave it a 10, but it's not one of my top 10's persay. One could argue "Paint It Black" is objectively a more well-known entity. I would've given it an 8 or 9 myself, like I said before I'd rather listen to Vanessa Carlton's version, but never really was too fussed on any variation of the song anyway, that's why I never picked it. Maybe my parents (who both gave "Jumpin' Jack Flash" a 7 and agree with most of you) would've preferred that decision too.

The Aretha version:




A live of "Paint It Back", the missed opportunity for the band in this rate.



 
And yes, I was going to mention this earlier but "Paint It, Black" is a shocking omission especially considering which two songs by The Rolling Stones made it to this rate. I love that song (would've been a 10 for me) and actually first heard of it through this excellent cover from 1966:




As for "Jumpin' Jack Flash", I just find it lame and learning that it's from 1968 is surprising considering it aged worse and sounds less progressive than most of the songs which were released earlier. Definitely belongs to the boring 'dad rock' camp. It was my second lowest rated song of the entire rate and now everything left received at least a 5 from me.

#57 will have a couple people's first 10, including Hazey's Mom. It's from radio station we've previously already hit (so Motown remains unscathed). It's also the first song with female vocals.
I'm hoping this is Bobbie Gentry but it could be something by The Mamas and the Papas which wouldn't be ideal but I wouldn't really be bothered as long as it's not you-know-which song.
 
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While I definitely have a few lower scores on my list, I'm not too concerned about Jumpin' Jack Flash leaving now. I like it well enough, but in the grand scheme of things, even just looking at the Stones' own discography, it always just screamed "generic rocker" to me. Something more melodic like Paint It, Black, but also Ruby Tuesday or even She's A Rainbow would certainly have scored a bit higher on PJ.
 
he/him
#57

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Pure Moods Americana 14th/15

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Peter, Paul, and Mary - Leaving on a Jet Plane

7.550

Highest
| 10 x 3 | @Hazey's Mom, @soratami, @unnameable

Lowest | 4 | @Aester | 5 | @One of One

Released | September 1969

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#2
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#1

Halfway Mark
| #57 (7.750) -- most of the love was very early, after five voters it was sitting at #20.

Songfacts | This was written by a very young John Denver, who was then a member of the Chad Mitchell Trio before beginning his solo career in the 1970s. Denver wrote this in 1967 during a layover at Washington airport, "Not so much from feeling that way for someone, but from the longing of having someone to love." The Chad Mitchell Trio recorded the song that year, as did Spanky & Our Gang and Peter, Paul and Mary. It only became a hit when the latter act covered the song again two years later.

On one of his BBC radio specials, John Denver said: "This is a very personal and very special song for me. It doesn't conjure up Boeing 707s or 747s for me as much as it does the simple scenes of leaving. Bags packed and standing by the front door, taxi pulling up in the early morning hours, the sound of a door closing behind you, and the thought of leaving someone that you care for very much. I was fortunate to have Peter, Paul and Mary record it and have it become a hit, but it still strikes a lonely and anguished chord in me, because the separation still continues, although not so long and not so often nowadays."

The 1969 hit version by Peter, Paul and Mary came at a great time for Denver, who had just disbanded the Chad Mitchell Trio. Denver became the senior member of the group when Joe Frazier and Mike Kobluk left (Denver replaced Chad Mitchell, chosen in an audition that drew about 300 singers), but had no name recognition. Some of his first solo appearances were billed as "John Denver, writer of 'Leaving On A Jet Plane'." Known for this song, Denver got some club appearances and TV gigs, which helped launch his career as one of the biggest-selling artists of the '70s.

John Denver successfully took legal action against New Order, claiming that the guitar break on New Order's third single from their Technique album, "Run 2," too closely resembled "Leaving on a Jet Plane." The case was settled out of court, and as a result the single can never be re-released in its original form.

This became the biggest hit for Peter, Paul and Mary, and also their last. The trio charted 12 times on the Top 40 from 1962-1969, scoring with their renditions of "Puff the Magic Dragon" and "Blowin' in the Wind".

My parents are big fans of this band, so I had these other two songs listed in early renditions of the rate. I decided this was less dull than "Blowin' in the Wind" and more serious than "Puff the Magic Dragon" (and probably the most known hit anyway). My Mom especially loves the latter as it fits in with her love for fantasy themes (she definitely doesn't see it as the drug-theme most pull from the song dd). I would've given any of the three songs mentioned the 7 I gave this. To me, they're pleasant-but-dull, alot like all the Carpenters songs my Mom loves.

Commentary

Looks like I'm right in line with most of Popjustice based on these two comments. Poor Mom.

@berserkboi (7) - Nice enough song!

@Maki (7.25) - Relaxing and very pleasant with great harmonising, some nice melodies too but overall not that impressive.

John Denver's original. Another artist Mama Hazey loves, good thing it was released in the 70s or you would've had to listen to "Thank God I'm a Country Boy".



"Puff the Magic Dragon" at one of their reunion concerts, which play on TV every so often.

 
Huh, now that is a surprising elimination. In no way I thought "Leaving on a Jet Plane" would end up in the bottom 5, and it surely didn't deserve that either. I guess it most likely suffered from being on the 'nice and pleasant' side which resulted in a plenty of 7s and that clearly isn't enough in a rate with such high averages but still, it evokes more than quite a few of the songs here. In hindsight, I could've scored it a bit higher.
Not exactly a loss for me but a very random early cut, I could've imagined at least 20 songs leaving instead of that one at this point.
 
Peter, Paul and Mary had great harmonies, but in a rate with the Mamas and Papas and The Beach Boys, there were always going to be more favoured vocal groups. I threw a 10 because I love a good harmony, but I understand it not being everyone's cup of tea.

John Denver - found fame with "Leaving on a jet plane". Left this world on a propellor plane.
 
If someone did do a 70s rate, what genres would they take?
Disco, and would you take the start of electronic music or prefer the days when dance music had real drums and bass (see The Village People)?
Soul, and how it overlaps with disco (I believe disco is when Thelma Houston sings "don't leave me this way", and it's soul when Teddy Pendergrass sings it).
Country when it was at its most inspirational and most depressing, and had it's own Shania or Taylor in the form of Olivia Newton-John?
Rock, back when you could go heavy and then switch to a mandolin ballad on the next track?
Musical theatre, when Broadway production soundtrack albums topped the charts?
 
he/him
If someone did do a 70s rate, what genres would they take?
Disco, and would you take the start of electronic music or prefer the days when dance music had real drums and bass (see The Village People)?
Soul, and how it overlaps with disco (I believe disco is when Thelma Houston sings "don't leave me this way", and it's soul when Teddy Pendergrass sings it).
Country when it was at its most inspirational and most depressing, and had it's own Shania or Taylor in the form of Olivia Newton-John?
Rock, back when you could go heavy and then switch to a mandolin ballad on the next track?
Musical theatre, when Broadway production soundtrack albums topped the charts?

Mama Hazey pretty much agrees you just covered the 70s quite well.
 
If someone did do a 70s rate, what genres would they take?
Disco, and would you take the start of electronic music or prefer the days when dance music had real drums and bass (see The Village People)?
Soul, and how it overlaps with disco (I believe disco is when Thelma Houston sings "don't leave me this way", and it's soul when Teddy Pendergrass sings it).
Country when it was at its most inspirational and most depressing, and had it's own Shania or Taylor in the form of Olivia Newton-John?
Rock, back when you could go heavy and then switch to a mandolin ballad on the next track?
Musical theatre, when Broadway production soundtrack albums topped the charts?
I think 70s singer-songwriter ladies and more folk moments would be a category too given that we had an entire rate dedicated to them. Though I'm only really here for Janis Ian out of these.

It's always reminded me of a nursery rhyme.
I actually had that exact same impression for another song (from the Motown section). "Leaving on a Jet Plane" feels a bit too mature and 'serious' for me to associate it with a nursery rhyme and but the melody does have a certain sway to it which I guess can be tied to that.
Still surprised we eliminated a very pleasant song with mostly female vocals so early on. Hopefully we get rid of a batch of men next to make up for that.
 
he/him
#57

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Haan FM's British Invasion 14th/15

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The Hollies - He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother

7.638

Highest
| 10 x 3 | @DJHazey, @Hazey's Mom, @berserkboi

Lowest | 5 x 3 | @WoW73, @Aester, @daninternational

Released | September 1969

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#1
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#7

Halfway Mark
| #38 (8.450) -- After seven voters it was #27, sigh, what could've been. This result is trash.

Songfacts | The title came from the motto for Boys Town, a community formed in 1917 by a Catholic priest named Father Edward Flanagan. Located in Omaha, Nebraska, it was a place where troubled or homeless boys could come for help. In 1941, Father Flanagan was looking at a magazine called The Messenger when he came across a drawing of a boy carrying a younger boy on his back, with the caption, "He ain't heavy Mr., he's my brother." Father Flanagan thought the image and phrase captured the spirit of Boys Town, so he got permission and commissioned a statue of the drawing with the inscription, "He ain't heavy Father, he's my brother." The statue and phrase became the logo for Boys Town. In 1979, girls were allowed and the name was eventually changed to Girls And Boys Town. The logo was updated with a drawing of a girl carrying a younger girl added.

This was originally released by Kelly Gordon, a producer who has worked with Glen Campbell, Aretha Franklin, and David Lee Roth.

In the Guardian newspaper of February 24, 2006, Hollies guitarist Tony Hicks said: "In the 1960s when we were short of songs I used to root around publishers in Denmark Street. One afternoon, I'd been there ages and wanted to get going but this bloke said: 'Well there's one more song. It's probably not for you.' He played me the demo by the writers [Bobby Scott and Bob Russell]. It sounded like a 45rpm record played at 33rpm, the singer was slurring, like he was drunk. But it had something about it. There were frowns when I took it to the band but we speeded it up and added an orchestra. The only things left recognizable were the lyrics. There'd been this old film called Boys Town about a children's home in America, and the statue outside showed a child being carried aloft and the motto He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother. Bob Russell had been dying of cancer while writing. We never got, or asked for, royalties. Elton John - who was still called Reg - played piano on it and got paid 12 pounds. It was a worldwide hit twice."

This was the second single The Hollies released after Graham Nash left the group to form Crosby, Stills, and Nash; the first was "Sorry Suzanne." Nash was replaced by Terry Sylvester.

Okay so now I know where one source of that name comes from dd.

This has been covered by many artists. It was a hit for Neil Diamond later in 1970, and also for Olivia Newton-John in 1976.

This was used in an anti-drug commercial in Canada during '90s. The basis was two old friends meeting again in the hospital. There are some old home movie type flash backs, then they hug and the one in hospital garb cries.

A various artists charity version recorded under the name of The Justice Collective topped the UK singles charts during Christmas 2012.

This ended up feeling like a controversial decision when I swapped out "Bus Stop" by The Hollies for this one. It had always been a song I enjoyed, but never knew who it was by or what it was called, kind of like the Procol Harum song in this rate. The controversy was thinking people might not have any idea what the song was, but seeing how it's been covered several times, it's probably universally known in retrospect. Still, considering a song like "Bus Stop" is a bop in comparison, I figured it would have trouble with any new listeners especially. This result kind of cements that, but it deserves better. Hearing the lyrics, immediately should tell anybody that something 'heavy' is being portrayed. There is a ton emotion in the song, especially with how it's sung and the vocal runs are almost ghostly. It will always be an all-time favorite song. I was surprised my Mom loves it as much too, because I never knew that she enjoyed it anymore than it just playing on the radio with no real engagement to it. (She was like 'it's a beautiful song, very meaningful') My Dad however 'only' gave this an 8 and I pretty sure he would have rather gave "Bus Stop" a 9 or even a 10.

Commentary

@berserkboi (10) - Glorious!

Who would've ever thought you start a rate and have four eliminations with @berserkboi's average only being a 6.75? About time the high-scoring machine cranks out his usual scores.

@daninternational (5) - Claim to fame: One of The Hollies ran over my Great Aunt.

Oh no, that explains the low score then.

@Maki (7.25) - This is somehow both beautiful and boring at the same time.

Understandable but I'm betting the more someone hears this, the more it would resonate.

Hear is the other Hollies song that could've been in the rate.

 
'Spirit In The Sky' and 'Jumpin' Jack Flash' have very good backing tracks but their lyrics bring them both down a bit.

'Leaving On A Jet Plane' is airily pleasant but I prefer the John Denver original.

I appreciate why people would love 'Like A Rolling Stone' and 'He Ain't Heavy...,' but they're just not for me; I gave them 6s.

My favourite 'Hollies' song is 'The Air That I Breathe.'
 

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