PopJustice Book Club | Page 138 | The Popjustice Forum

PopJustice Book Club

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Amstell_s Bitch, Sep 10, 2006.

  1. High Fidelity is a classic
     
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  2. I'm reading The Shipping News by Annie Proulx...five years after I bought it.
     
  3. I wanted to go and live in Newfoundland after reading it years back.
     
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  4. LTG

    LTG

    Booker shortlist:

    Diane Cook - The New Wilderness
    Tsitsi Dangarembga - This Mournable Body
    Avni Doshi - Burnt Sugar
    Maaza Mengiste - The Shadow King
    Douglas Stuart - Shuggie Bain
    Brandon Taylor - Real Life

     
    Trinu 3.0 likes this.
  5. Honestly surprised at Hillary not going through.

    I’m gonna try read them all like with the International one, but I hope our fellow hunty Brandon gets it!
     
    LTG likes this.
  6. LTG

    LTG

    I’m not too surprised at Mantel going. I feel they had to put her on the shortlist but a majority were debuts and the judges clearly want to make a statement about new authors coming through.

    I’ve bought Real Life but need to get round to it. I think Douglas Stuart is a [redacted] too, I saw both him and Taylor contributed to this: The Best LGBTQ+ Books, According to LGBTQ+ Authors
     
    Trinu 3.0 likes this.
  7. Yeah, I imagined they wanted to showcase newer voices.

    Dangarembga being the only veteran, but I guess she’s not that well known in the west?
     
  8. Honestly SHOOK that they’ve completely swerved a Mantel treble.

    Real Life made it though, which is fantastic.
     
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  9. I read Mr Loverman before Girl, Woman,Other and think I preferred it. Both were excellent books and nice to read back to back. I feel embarrassed that I didn't know about Bernadine Evaristo until this year, but at least there is a back catalogue to delve into.
     
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  10. I finished Autumn yesterday, short, a little sweet, nut it didn't really build up to anything, and was surprised when it just ended.
    Anyone read anymore in Ali Smith's Seasons books? Are they worth it?
     
  11. Yeah I feel silly not knowing of her stuff until the start of 2020, but I now have so many of her books to catch up on!
     
  12. Im currently reading Douglas Stuart and its brilliant so far.Brandon Taylor will be next.
     
    Trinu 3.0 likes this.
  13. SavidgeReads raises a good point wondering if sequels should be up for literary prizes. Sure, the quality of the writing might be superb, but if the story doesn't hold up without having read the prequel... is it really fair? I guess it's one of the reasons some people were a bit iffy about Atwood winning last year and the same could be said about Mantell: she can be a fantastic writer, but can the book stand by itself? I don't think.gif
    Although, This Mournable Body is also a sequel (also third part), so it'll be interesting if it wins and makes this whole reasoning invalid ñññ

    I think I'll start with those as well for gay reasons. I want to read the whole shortlist, but I want to read The Years and The Three-Body Problem trilogy before my K*ndle Unlimited trial ends on October 9th. So that only gives me five weeks for six books (eight, with the Dangarembga trilogy?). Yay.

    I should get cracking.
     
  14. LTG

    LTG

    I don’t think there’s anything wrong with a sequel winning a prize, as long as the story holds up. At least in Britain we know the Henry VIII story more than most of our history, so there wouldn’t be any difficulty in understanding Bring Up the Bodies without having read Wolf Hall.

    Pat Barker’s The Ghost Road won in the 90s and was the third in a trilogy. JG Farrell’s The Siege of Krishnapur won in the 70s and is the second in a thematic trilogy rather than with the same characters and continuing a plot.

    The Testaments probably wouldn’t stand up as a great piece of fiction without The Handmaid’s Tale, but you can’t deny the themes are very relevant today, and the judges probably wanted to right a history wrong in Kingsley Amis winning over The Handmaid’s Tale.
     
    Trinu 3.0 likes this.
  15. I'm not saying their shouldn't or couldn't win, just saying that some questions were raised ññ
    I was rooting for her to be the first triple winner, but alas.

    My Spanish ass never knew much of Henry VIII until it lived in UK (and watched SIX) so

    ¯\_༼ ಥ ‿ ಥ ༽_/¯
     
  16. I can’t believe the world at large wasn’t as bored stiff with Wolf Hall as I was.
     
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  17. LTG

    LTG

    Henry VIII, the Romans, WWII and the Victorians and the abolition of the slave trade are really all we get taught while history is compulsory.
     
  18. Agreed. I am tempted to give it another go mainly because the hardback reissues are so fucking pretty but I got 100 pages in and gave up when I first read Wolf Hall.
     
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  19. This is an amazing feature on Susanne Clarke:



    I remember reading back in the day how some unknown illness was keeping her from writing more, so it's great to see her doing somewhat better and with a new book out after so long. Piranesi sounds amazing.

    For real. The moment I have 50 quid to spare, I'm getting them
    [​IMG]
     
    Alphableat likes this.
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