PopJustice Book Club

I've been enjoying Young Mungo over the past three days. It might be the quickest I've read a book, not on holiday, in years
I finished my copy a few days ago and found it just brilliant. I should have picked it up sooner! I do hope Douglas Stuart is writing another book soon.
 
Finished The Unconsoled



A Pale View of the Hills remains unimpeachable but I think this is probably rounding out my top 3 Ishiguro with it + The Remains of the Day (An Artist of the Floating World is underrated though!).

The scenes that have stuck with me the most are indisputably the recounting of the father not going to his grieving daughter and instead listening through the door, the tension of Ryder and Boris when Sophie gifts Boris the manual, and when Miss Collins is recounting life and regret. And that final tram scene! God, what a genius.
 
I'm about to finish Asako Yzuki's Butter. Really enjoying it. Then on to Oisin McKenna's Evenings and Weekends which comes endorsed by Russell Tovey and Tomasz Jefrowki.
 
Double post but I'm planning on finally diving into Toni Morrison for my next read. I've heard The Bluest Eye is a good starting point, I'm curious if anyone would agree or could offer an alternative? I only know that I want to save Beloved for when I have a couple of her books under my belt since it's generally seen as 'the' one.

The Bluest Eye is definitely the perfect starting point; Song of Solomon, Sula, and Beloved are my favorites though.
 
Double post but I'm planning on finally diving into Toni Morrison for my next read. I've heard The Bluest Eye is a good starting point, I'm curious if anyone would agree or could offer an alternative? I only know that I want to save Beloved for when I have a couple of her books under my belt since it's generally seen as 'the' one.
The Bluest Eyes is a good place to start because a) I love a chronological journey through a writer’s work, and b) it’s relatively ~easy by her standards.

Follow it up with Song of Solomon, which is an absolute yarn. Enjoy!
 
I recently finished Close to Home by Michael Magee. Wow, what a zinger of a book. I knew a fair load of Irish at uni, so all the slang/colloquialisms were familiar and very charming.

Has anyone else enjoyed this? Genuinely sad to finish it and my newest read isn’t hitting just yet.
 
I'm trying to up my reading, so last week I kicked it off with Yellowface and The Tattooist of Auschwitz.

The former I thought was really well written, and I loved to hate June though did feel sympathy towards her at times. Then again I don't think anyone comes off particularly well by the end and maybe that's the point!

The Tattooist I was so engrossed in I finished it in a day. I get the criticisms and frankly the romance was the least interesting part of the story for me ddd but I couldn't wait to finish it.
 
he/him/basic cishomo
So I absolutely loved The Book of Accidents and so I'm doing Chuck Wendig's latest Black River Orchard. It features my absolute favorite audiobook narrator ever, Queen Gabra Zackman, as an extremely slutty redhead and the narrator of various mood-setting vignettes throughout. The actual definition of talent and range. (STREAM DRINKING: A LOVE STORY TODAY.)

But I'm also getting increasingly disturbed by it. Like, fuck. This is a good book.

But also consistently giving me:
 
Have been wanting to make reading a consistent activity in my life again so I got an easy win with the Britney book which was rather lovely and empathetic if not terribly substantial. But I wasn’t looking for it to be either so, it was a great starting off point.

After that, I just finished today Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow (about what, two years after everyone else?) and was utterly engulfed. I don’t know how to describe other than it felt that the act of reading it was healing and nourishing to me in a way I have not felt in a long while. I was delighted.

Next book now reading tonight is Black AF History by Michael Harriot because I love his work on The Root!
 
he/him/basic cishomo
Black River Orchard will always be famous. It's one of those that I think works better in audio form but it's a rec from me. Very peculiar but captivating little horror story with lots of vindication and legit disturbing imagery. Am I a little afraid of pretty apples now? Maybe so.
 
I’ve just finished Brooklyn. I love the picture painted of the immigrant experience and how your adopted home changes you to make your actual home the foreign place, but also that undeniable pull of home. I also kind of love the general banality of the first 150+ pages. I really had no idea what was going to happen at the end until I read it. Would I say it’s deserving of its praise? Not necessarily, but Colm really paints vividly with his prose.

I also have read Disorientation by Elaine Hsieh Chou. Similar to Yellowface, but I actually enjoyed it more? It was a ride and got so ridiculous but I couldn’t put it down. I’d also say it’s kinda camp? Definitely recommend it!
 
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