PopJustice Book Club | Page 83 | The Popjustice Forum

PopJustice Book Club

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Amstell_s Bitch, Sep 10, 2006.

  1. I read A Little Life last week since it seems to be everywhere again right now. I loved it while reading it but after finishing it I am not so sure.

    While I understood the trauma happening over and over again was important, that car crash at the end was SO unnecessary. With the trauma repeating itself again there is a sense of how his damaged psyche (and the circumstances of his life) are bringing him back again to the same dark places, but that whole car crash was such a twist of fate that just felt cruel for cruelty's sake.

    I really like the idea of telling a story where suicide in the end is a compassionate choice when someone is mentally (and I guess physically) suffering as much as Jude, something you understand. BUT I think it would have been a stronger choice if he had done it, in spite of the fact that his life had reached some stability. Killing off Willem was fucking rude.

    Anyway, I finished it and enjoyed it for what it was but the more interviews with Hanya Yanagihara I watch and read the more I start to despise the book. Maybe she's just not that good of a writer?
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2018
    Trinu 3.0 likes this.
  2. I finished The Power and actually don’t rate it that much. I think I just didn’t think much of the central four characters. Margot had the most potential, but I feel it didn’t delve deep enough into the political shit that would’ve been going on. It only skimmed the surface. Similarly, the gangster stuff with Roxie didn’t feel deep enough. But then Allie was just boring and Tunde was constantly meandering about taking pictures.

    Basically it didn’t go as hard as I wanted it to. And the ending was quite underwhelming.

    It’s a shame because the concept is stunning, but it just didn’t do enough with it unfortunately.
     
  3. Oooh I didn’t know about this thread!
    I’m more into the Fantasy genre, whenever I do get around to reading anything.

    I’m currently reading Heartless by Marissa Meyer. I’m really liking it! I like her style, her reimagining of classic fairytales is an interesting concept. I’m not sure if it’s particularly common?
    It’s basically a prequel to Alice In Wonderland. Tells the story of how a baker became the Queen Of Hearts we all know from that classic novel.

    Definitely gonna check out Marissa’s other works, I’ve read great things about The Lunar Chronicles! Any fans?


    Had just finished The Chemist by Stephenie Meyer before that. It was good. I thought the ending was pretty quick. She seemed to lay out everything slowly enough over most of the book and then BAM! The End!
    I liked it, though it reminded me she isn’t the best writer out there haha
     
  4. Everything I Never Told You was a five star affair. Loved it.

    Dipping into Grayson Perry’s The Descent of Man now, but got my eye on Ready Player One before it hits cinemas.
     
  5. I'm rereading Ready Player One ahead of the movie release and I'd forgotten how rich the descriptions of the world in that time period are. It'll be interesting to see how it comes to life on screen. My friend worked on the film and says it's quite different.
     
  6. I bought this the other day, looking forward to reading it!
     
  7. I’ve just started this! Very hooked already.
     
    Tribal Spaceman likes this.
  8. For anyone that likes a bit of YA, I see 'The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue' brought up in many a booktube video and its actually in the Kindle spring sale for £1.99.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. I just finished The Collector by John Fowles and I fear that I'll never feel whole again.

    A stunning novel but bleak, bleak, bleak beyond words.
     
    enjoy and dancingwithmyself like this.
  10. I'm reading The Sparsholt Affair. It's sooooooo good, I'm obsessed.
     
    Beautiful Child 2 likes this.
  11. It's on the top of my "to get" list (which is quite different from the "to read" one, obs).
    I hope it's as good as they said in the reviews

    I've been trying to get more into poetry lately.
    I read Rupi's debut and it did nothing for me, but I'm now reading Ocean Vuong's and I have no words.
    This one in particular I've read like 4 times.

    Also, is anybody into literary magazines?
    I just read a pretty good essay on Chelsea Manning on The White Review and I'm curious now about other good magazines out there.
     
  12. Your post made me check the reviews- I'm now very interested.
     
  13. So I’m reading Simon vs, The Homo Sapiens Agenda and it’s kind of basic but I also freaking love it.
     
  14. I've read it twice and its really charming. Looking forward to the film.
     
    Smooth Criminal and londonrain like this.
  15. I finished Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda and... it's had quite the effect on me. What a wonderful little book, even if I did figure out who Blue was very early on. I'm guessing they can be a little more subtle with it in the film.

    It's actually left me feeling quite... sad? I think I have leftover regrets about coming out so late and not getting all those teenage experiences as a gay person.
     
  16. I finished The Dinner Guest yesterday.
    Since it's nominated for the Booker International, I was expecting a lot... and no.

    Next on my Booker list is The Flying Mountain, which I started last night and I'm loving it for now.
    It is written in blank verse, which I had no idea what it meant, but it's basically what your favourite instapoet Rupi does:
    036DA91A-625D-4698-A394-35632BB61823.JPG

    As for verses, I'm also reading Night Sky with Exit Wounds and Calling a Wolf a Wolf.
    I'm quite new to poetry and many times Ocean's leaves me a bit like

    [​IMG]

    And other times I'm more of a
    [​IMG]

    But Kaveh's definitely resonates more with me with his poems about alcoholism and the like.

    So yay Easter for giving me some quality reading time!
     
  17. Literary thread cross-pollination alert:

    If anyone wants some very short fiction in their lives, feel free to read the current entries in the Flash Fiction Competition and cast a vote.

    Even better: anyone can enter, so watch out for the next round. You only need to write 250 words, and you can enter anonymously if you like.

    (In other book-news, I’ve just started reading The Loney. Very intrigued where it will go.)
     
  18. Less, by Andrew Sean Green, has won the Pulitzer!

    I remember it being nominated for a Lambda Prize last year, but kinda passed over it.
    I guess I'll have to read it now!

    The Washington Post on it:

    Greer’s “Less” is nothing like those grave books. It’s not a serious story spiked with comic elements; it’s an unabashed comic novel, a descendant of the great “Lucky Jim” (1954), by Kingsley Amis.

    In the opening pages of “Less,” a 49-year-old writer learns that his former boyfriend is about to get married. To avoid attending the wedding as a heartbroken guest, he embarks on a humiliating trip around the world, teaching classes and delivering readings at any place that will have him.

    As a novel, it’s delightful. As a Pulitzer winner, it’s a unicorn.

    And he is also a unicorn...
    [​IMG]

    Stanning.
     
    londonrain and Remorque like this.
  19. LTG

    LTG

    Watch Madonna try to get her Greta Wells series out quickly to capitalise on the hype. (I do have that on my list to read though).
     
    Remorque likes this.
  20. I'm reading an absolutely incredible book at the moment called The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet. It's a space opera in a series of books (with the third one out later this year) and it's genuinely delightful.

    It's about a multi-species crew, who dig wormholes in space for the Galactic Commons (an alliance between alien civilisations, including what remains of the human race), and the pasts they are running from as they take on the most dangerous job of their career.

    It was sold to me as an homage to TV shows like Firefly and Farscape, but really stands on its own two feet. in establishing such a rich and accessible universe. The way the writer creates such an intriguing and fleshed out alien world, while still making it such a profoundly human story is really masterful. The dialogue is so snappy, it's really an effortless read. I honestly can't recommend it enough. I can't wait to read the next one.
     
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