Sugababes - "When the Rain Comes" + 9th Album

And yet you have people claiming online (and getting lots of likes) that her version is “better” dddd.


“Change” uses an Apple iLife royalty free sample all over it.


Actually a bit shocked at this. Was all the budget for Change just spent on Dr. L**e?
 
Denial, No Can Do, Change and Follow Me Home are definitely all on my wishlist for them to do.


As close as to what we will get Change wise.

Glastonbury is iconic, so I can see why this changed the course for the Sugababes in a dramatic and positive way. People went absolutely mental for them!

Mighty Hoopla was always going to embrace the babes one way or another. Whereas Glastonbury they really had no idea how they were going to be received. From memory, some of the girls won’t expecting anyone or just under a thousand to see them. But to have the entire area go crazy and shut down was an Indication that they are very much loved and wanted.
 
I would put "Push The Button" and "About You Now" in the exact same space in terms of pop songs, to be honest. The former feels just as much of an outlier as the latter, and ultimately they're both purpose-built to be hit singles. I can only imagine the scorn a line like, "My sexy ass has got him in a new dimension" would incite if Mutya wasn't around to legitimise it, which has nothing to do with her ass and everything to do with their status as a credible band, which really began to rot when Keisha was left as the sole remaining original member, regardless of how good or bad the music afterwards was.

Exactly.

Sugababes were always the edgy, stank face, bully-each-other-might-bully-you-but-can-really-sing alternative to shiny, radio-tailored pop acts.

Their whole brand was about being real, authentic, and maybe even a little bit "street".

"About You Now" and "Push The Button" mark the moment when the brand took a turn - for the worse, in my opinion - towards increasingly faceless pop.

Now I celebrate them for the big nostalgic GP-adored hits that they are, while recognizing they don't hold a candle to the likes of "Overload" or "Stronger", for example.
 
I do hope every now and then they pull out a random back catalogue track from later that nobody expects. I get they probably feel weird doing songs from 3.0, but there are some absolute treasures to be found across those 2 albums. They don't need to replicate every single track they've ever done, but just a nod here and there would be nice.
Would absolutely love to hear a 1.0 version of Conversation’s Over. That would just be magic.
 
Exactly.

Sugababes were always the edgy, stank face, bully-each-other-might-bully-you-but-can-really-sing alternative to shiny, radio-tailored pop acts.

Their whole brand was about being real, authentic, and maybe even a little bit "street".

"About You Now" and "Push The Button" mark the moment when the brand took a turn - for the worse, in my opinion - towards increasingly faceless pop.

Now I celebrate them for the big nostalgic GP-adored hits that they are, while recognizing they don't hold a candle to the likes of "Overload" or "Stronger", for example.

We can call them edgy/alternative/, yes, but there are also some tropes that factor into calling them ‘street’ and the ‘bully’ narratives that Keisha has spoken about.

The notion that Keisha and Mutya are less pop never sits quite right with me. They’ve always had eclectic taste. Keisha’s tastes range from S Club 7 to SWV and you can hear that throughout her discography.

I also think there’s a false equivalence in comparing Push the Button with About You Now. One is electronic on an album of electro clash inspired and pristinly written pop/R&B and another is a tinny pop-rock track on an album of casts offs and fillers.
 
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Imagine referring to a multi-ethnic group as “stank face, bully-each-other-might-bully-you-but-can-really-sing” in 2024. Do better.

I'm talking about their public image back in early 2000s. Back when music acts were described as urban as code for black or R&B/Hip-Hop inspired. There were definitely (racial/misogynist/classist) tropes involved, but that wasn't the point of my post. If and when they were pop, they weren't pop in the same uber-smiley, Hollywood-ready, bright California sun way that S Club 7 were, or even in the ways that Steps or Girls Aloud (past Sound of the Underground's edge and the general kookiness of Xenomania productions) ever were.
 
So subverting those harmful stereotypes and showing their range with an album like Taller was a bad thing? I’m not understanding your point?
 
So subverting those harmful stereotypes and showing their range with an album like Taller was a bad thing? I’m not understanding your point?

The stereotypes (interpreted from and projected back onto the music) were bad, the music itself was good.

The new music stepping away from that might have sold more - and may have been calculated to step away from the stereotypes, I don't know - but sacrificed what made them special in the first place.
 
Their “public image at the time” was built up by the media, the ‘babes promoted themselves as cool, real, proper artists who wrote their own material and weren’t making songs for children (sorry Steps/S Club), and aloof, but not one bit of them was about being aggressive outside of, arguably, two fantastic music videos (one which brilliantly took the idea of that image and spun them into vampires and other as scorned rocker girl friends). Not to mention the characterization was primarily aimed at Mutya and Keisha, as Siobhan was painted as a victim and Heidi as the “relatable” one.

And while, yes, it was how they were perceived in the past, it’s an image/take that was greatly over exaggerated and misrepresented them and we don’t really need to carry it forward when describing them. Its just amusing that Atomic Kitten are never described with a sense of viciousness and air of “danger” even though there was infighting between them behind the scenes (and straight up brawls in AK’s case as we learned in the Big Reunion).
 
When the Rain Cums

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