Top of the Pops BBC4

So we're just getting another one of these again

Top Of The Pops: Review of 2023

BBC Two and BBC iPlayer
Top Of The Pops returns for a special hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo.
The show will take a look back over the last 12 months delving into music’s biggest stories and showcasing performances from some of the most talked about artists of 2023.
Top Of The Pops: Review of 2023 is a BBC Studios (1 x 60) production for BBC Two and BBC iPlayer. It was commissioned by Suzanne McManus, Commissioning Editor for Entertainment. The Executive Producer for BBC Studios is Alison Howe.
FM2
 
Baby D - Fantasy was super cool in Greece during fall of 1992, like they'd play it every hour in clubs and people would scream and cry. The other singles didn't do anything and they were thought of as a Livin Joy kitch act. Mean!
 
Dee was of course no stranger to TOTP – here is her first appearance (she's on the right, at the back) with husband Phil Fearon …



Check out the leg warmers – very 1983! (And a far cry from Baby D!)

I only found out about that connection via the Journey Through SAW podcast. What is 'cool', anyway?
 
Thoughts on 1995 so far:
1. The 'indie' bands are really boring to watch. I'm thinking of Dodgy in particular. Where's the rebellion? Where's the vibrancy? It's all so Jamie Oliver.
2. Boyzone. On the one hand, they look like the most unpolished boyband on TOTP so far - the clothes, the hair, the moves etc. are so unoriginal, and they look like they were randomly chosen from a street in Dublin. On the other hand, Ronan and Stephen really do look like boys who just got off the school bus. And doing MOR covers (and originals that are pastiches of those MOR covers) appeals to the mums and nans as well. An obvious recipe for success! Why hadn't anyone thought of it before?
 
Thoughts on 1995 so far:
1. The 'indie' bands are really boring to watch. I'm thinking of Dodgy in particular. Where's the rebellion? Where's the vibrancy? It's all so Jamie Oliver.
2. Boyzone. On the one hand, they look like the most unpolished boyband on TOTP so far - the clothes, the hair, the moves etc. are so unoriginal, and they look like they were randomly chosen from a street in Dublin. On the other hand, Ronan and Stephen really do look like boys who just got off the school bus. And doing MOR covers (and originals that are pastiches of those MOR covers) appeals to the mums and nans as well. An obvious recipe for success! Why hadn't anyone thought of it before?
Dodgy were so tedious - and it's funny you should mention Jamie Oliver, as I'm sure their music was used to advertise one of his shows.
 
Thoughts on 1995 so far:
1. The 'indie' bands are really boring to watch. I'm thinking of Dodgy in particular. Where's the rebellion? Where's the vibrancy? It's all so Jamie Oliver.
Wholeheartedly agree about the boring indie bands. In a sea of beige Britpop I can really understand why the likes of Deuce, Whigfield and Gina G stood out and were so important to queer kids starved of pop music in the mid 90s.
 
Boyzone. On the one hand, they look like the most unpolished boyband on TOTP so far - the clothes, the hair, the moves etc. are so unoriginal, and they look like they were randomly chosen from a street in Dublin. On the other hand, Ronan and Stephen really do look like boys who just got off the school bus. And doing MOR covers (and originals that are pastiches of those MOR covers) appeals to the mums and nans as well. An obvious recipe for success! Why hadn't anyone thought of it before?
Taste and self-respect!
 
she/her
I do wonder if perhaps I was into Britpop mainly because heavy metal was uncool and grunge was dead so it just seemed the obvious way to go if you were "alternative" (ugh I hate that word). I mean some of those songs still sound great to me - some Oasis, Pulp, maybe Blur - but SO MUCH of it was clearly mediocre. I still have some on playlists but I don't listen to it a lot. I'm very glad I reached the age where I didn't care so much about being cool and returned to the joy of hair metal, pop, and stuff I had missed the first time around like 70s glam and yacht rock.
 
For me, I'd grown up with and loved the whole Stock Aitken Waterman sound, but by the time I was 14/15 in 1995 I wanted something a bit different and drifted towards the likes of Pulp and Radiohead then Texas and had little time for acts like Deuce and Gina G.

I was however lured in by the Spice Girls for a while as I thought the singles were genuinely decent.
 
I was thinking earlier I must've been quite unusual getting into dance music first (94/95), and then cheesy pop later. But I guess there wasn't as much of a pop scene to get into in the mid-90s. Though I loved Deuce of course.

My first single was Baby D - which I've always seen as quite a cool record, actually!
 
*some* queer kids. Others found them a bit.... trite and contrived, and were more into the Britpop stuff at the time.
For further reading...Gay Bar by Jeremy Atherton Lin includes a chapter about Popstarz, the queer Britpop night in London in the 90s (think Brett from Suede).
Personally, I was on the Deuce/Gina G/Whigfield side of things...
 
I do wonder if perhaps I was into Britpop mainly because heavy metal was uncool and grunge was dead so it just seemed the obvious way to go if you were "alternative" (ugh I hate that word). I mean some of those songs still sound great to me - some Oasis, Pulp, maybe Blur - but SO MUCH of it was clearly mediocre. I still have some on playlists but I don't listen to it a lot. I'm very glad I reached the age where I didn't care so much about being cool and returned to the joy of hair metal, pop, and stuff I had missed the first time around like 70s glam and yacht rock.
You've articulated it so well. It dominated the music landscape and I don't even remember some of the quality of Britpop really being questioned. It was like a tank.
 
she/her
I was however lured in by the Spice Girls for a while as I thought the singles were genuinely decent.
I liked them too, at a time when i didn't listen to much other pop. I had a Girl Power t shirt that I wore to indie/rock nightclubs and thought myself very adventurous and subversive. I used to get a lot of comments on it, but possibly mainly because it was VERY tight and I'm blessed in the chest department (that sounds weird however I phrase it so apologies). Other similarly tight shirts in my collection were a Babybird 'You're Gorgeous' one and an England football 'Spirit of 66' one, which was a clear attempt at pulling boys as I've never had the slightest interest in football. But again, a very britpop vibe.
 
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